The jewish ethical views on the topic of abortion

To gain a clear understanding of when abortion is permitted or even required and when it is forbidden requires an appreciation of certain nuances of halacha Jewish law which govern the status of the fetus.

Thus abortion, although prohibited, does not constitute murder Tos. While some discuss the language and figures of speech like metaphorsothers weigh more heavily regarding the foundations of the religion and its male authoritative figures or simply the stories that tell the master-narrative, the juris-generative, communal ideas that re-calibrate the social norm.

It follows from this simple approach, that as a general rule, abortion in Judaism is permitted only if there is a direct threat to the life of the mother by carrying the fetus to term or through the act of childbirth.

Judaism and abortion

In cases of rape, Rabbi Shlomo Zalman Aurbach allows the woman to use methods which prevent pregnancy after intercourse.

The next great statute book, the Arbah Turim, was written by Rabbi Yaakov ben Asher9 in the early 14th century. Plaskow points out that it was women who strengthened the laws of niddah although their motives are unknown.

But if other damage ensues, the penalty shall be life for life Berman suggests the topic of globalization as an area on which nashiut ethics can comment because "it represents well the complex web of race, gender and class issues which are … the defining ingredients of early twenty-first century moral dilemmas.

It reaffirmed the obligation of Conservative Jewish women to abstain from sexual relations during menstruation and the immersion in the mikveh, but has also loosened the restrictions regarding niddah.

Jewish wedding ceremony[ edit ] Rachel Adler points out that the Jewish rituals surrounding marriage stem from biblical and talmudic conceptions of women as property and therefore reflect talmudic rites of property transfer.

Sanctity of life and abortion Judaism has a supreme concern for the sanctity of human life.

Judaism and abortion

Bythe Committee on Jewish Law and Standards permitted women to chant blessings before and after the Torah readings and inwomen counted as members of a minyan. Ross sees the fixed period of separation from her husband that women go into as parallel to the periods of separation that God enters when affording the world the opportunity to amass new creative powers.

As a rule, halacha does not assign relative values to different lives. And if men strive together, and hurt a woman with child, so that her fruit depart i.

The tractate has been subject to debate. Greenberg 12 [87] takes an alternative approach and through interviews finds that most women actually value and see the Mikveh as a positive ritual in Judaism and in their lives.

Abortion in Jewish Law

But this presumably requires that appropriate action to combat the mental distress be considered before abortion is permitted. Where do we find the final decision.

Ethical Topics: Abortion

Adler acknowledges that although traditional Jewish law has systematically ignored women's voices, she also recognizes the centrality of Halacha. The traditional Jewish view on abortion does not fit conveniently into any of the major "camps" in the current American abortion debate - Judaism neither bans abortion completely nor does it allow indiscriminate abortion.

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Judaism: Issues in Jewish Ethics

Abortion Essay “It is a mistake to reject religious principles in favour of secular/ethical principles for guidance in medical ethics” Examine and comment on this claim with reference to the topic you have investigated (50 marks) Abortion is the deliberate termination of a pregnancy after the fertilisation of the human ovum and before birth.

Note: This short essay is meant purely as an educational overview. Jewish law approaches each case according to its particular circumstances.

Abortion From the Perspective of Judaism

In any actual case, it is vital that qualified rabbis and medical professionals be consulted. If you have undergone an abortion, we recommend that you also read this article.

The concept of abortion in the Jewish law is not as strict as the Christian way; the Jewish legal authorities have not established principles by which to determine the morality and validity of abortion. The traditional Jewish view on abortion does not fit conveniently into any of the major "camps" in the current American abortion debate - Judaism neither bans abortion completely nor does it allow indiscriminate abortion.

The jewish ethical views on the topic of abortion
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Abortion in Judaism